Kickstarter at the 2018 Bay Area Maker Faire

Sometimes, how you make something is just as important as what you make. At this year’s Maker Faire in San Mateo, California, we’re showcasing creators who use materials in innovative, unexpected ways to make their projects more sustainable, accessible, or just plain beautiful.

You’ll see functional microscopes you can fold out of paper, architectural building components 3D-printed out of clay, lamps grown from mushroom roots, and much more. Read on to learn about what you’ll find at our booth and beyond.

Papier Machine
Papier Machine

Papier Machine
Raphaël Pluvinage, Marion Pinaffo, and Agnes Agullo were fascinated by the inner workings of the devices that surround us and wanted to find out what was going on inside all those little black boxes. So the Paris-based team researched electronics and created Papier Machine Vol. 0, a book of paper projects that translates the invisible world of circuits into vivid graphics, rendered in a colorful palette and shiny conductive ink. Kids — and curious folks of all ages — can understand the principles behind electrical components like tilt switches, wind sensors, and gyroscopes through a series of craft projects and playful interactions. They brought the project to Kickstarter earlier this year and found support from more than 1,800 backers. Visitors to Kickstarter’s booth will get to interact with wall-sized versions of Papier Machine’s creative circuits.

Foldscope
Foldscope

Foldscope 
Manu Prakash and Jim Cybulski invented the Foldscope, a pocket-sized DIY microscope made mostly out of paper, to use in their own biology research, which often took them to remote places without reliable access to traditional equipment. Along the way, they realized that the inexpensive scientific tool could be a boon to resource-challenged medical workers, students, and anyone curious to explore the world around them. They brought the idea to Kickstarter in 2016 and found support from more than 8,400 backers. Stop by Kickstarter’s booth to experience live demos of constructing and using the Foldscope.

Emerging Objects
Emerging Objects

Emerging Objects
Architects Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello make objects and structures that look like a cross between ancient artifacts and props from a science fiction film. The husband-and-wife team founded Emerging Objects to research new ways to 3D-print modular building components out of a wide range of materials, from clay, cement, coffee, and salt to reclaimed objects like discarded rubber tires. 

Their upcoming Kickstarter campaign will focus on launching the Bottery, a public workshop they plan to open in Oakland, California, to introduce more artists, designers, and makers to the possibilities of working with 3D-printed clay. Visitors to Kickstarter’s booth can see a live demo of Emerging Objects’ large-scale clay 3D printer and a collection of the objects they’ve designed.

The Material Matters Gallery

Another section of the booth will showcase other Kickstarter-funded objects made with unusual materials. Here’s what we’ll have on display:

Air-Ink: While studying at MIT, the team behind Graviky Labs invented a process to collect carbon from air pollution and turn it into safe, high-quality ink for artists.

Grow
Grow

Grow: Brooklyn-based designer Danielle Trofe collaborated with biomaterials company Ecovative to turn their renewable packaging materials made from mushroom roots into a kit that lets you grow your own lamp.

Huskee: This collective of Australian coffee experts came together to reduce the waste produced by the roasting process, turning coffee bean husks into durable, reusable cups.

Genusee
Genusee

Genusee: This Flint, Michigan-based team is creating eyewear made from recycled plastic water bottles, creating manufacturing jobs and repurposing waste generated by the city’s water crisis.

Bureo Minnow: Dedicated to addressing the problem of plastic pollution in our oceans, the designers behind Bureo turn fishnets collected along the coast of Chile into skateboard decks, sunglasses, and more.

Chairigami: Zach Rotholz fell in love with cardboard carpentry while creating custom furniture for children with disabilities at the Adaptive Design Association. Now he’s developed a whole line of flat-pack, recyclable chairs, desks, and tables.

Dual Bowls
Dual Bowls

Dual Bowls: Designer Kawther Al Saffar collaborates with craftspeople in Kuwait to create one-of-a-kind bowls that fuse multiple recycled metals, casting them in molds made with sand from the Nile River.

What we’re excited to see around Maker Faire

Beyond our booth, you’ll find more than sixty Kickstarter-funded projects across the Faire. Here are few that members of our team are excited to check out:

Kraut Source
Kraut Source

Julio Terra, Head of Design & Technology
“I love Kraut Source, a kit that makes it easy to ferment sauerkraut and kimchi using Mason jars. The creator, Karen Diggs, provide a set of delicious recipes that I’ve enjoyed exploring.” 

ModiBot
ModiBot

Aziz Hasan, Senior Director of Product Design
ModiBot’s DIY action figure building system is amazing. It unlocks imagination at a young age and gives kids the tools to create and design.”

nScope
nScope

Clarissa Redwine, West Coast Design & Tech Outreach Lead 
“I’m excited to see nScope’s laptop-connected electronics workbench. They’re working with backers to create a series of exercises that teach the basics of electronics.” 

Fibonacci Clock
Fibonacci Clock

David Gallagher, Senior Director of Communications
“Kickstarter is a place where impractical objects find people who love them. If you can’t remember the math required to tell time with Philippe Chrétien’s Fibonacci Clock, you can just sit back and enjoy its lovely geometries.”

Public Lab
Public Lab

Nick Yulman, Associate Editorial Director
“I admire Public Lab’s approach to citizen science — creating kits that let people contribute to meaningful scientific research. They got their start on Kickstarter in 2010, building a community of backers to map the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico using cameras carried aloft by balloons and kites.”

Inspired to make something yourself? Start a project of your own, or explore live Design and Technology projects on Kickstarter.

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